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Market Linkage

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Market Linkage

Most small businesses whether formal or informal suffer from one major problem - lack of markets for their goods or services making them undersell their wares. The sequel to this is poor capital formation which reflects in an unending poverty.

What improves livelihoods is not necessarily cash; it could be exchanging goods for their equivalent worth in cash terms. WillPower came to this reality after having dealt with many smallholder farmers through the credit programme but who invested in poultry keeping when terrorism killed the tourism market, hence killing the demand for poultry and poultry products. The end results was lack of orders and hence the lack of loan repayment.

While microfinance has been a major success as a tool to alleviate poverty, WillPower seeks to not just promote microfinance, but to promote a potential to create the funds that will be used to repay any credit that the poor may take from a micro-lending institution. We promote market linkage of what a sector produces and links the same with others who produce a different product that may be needed. We started by trading on monetary tokens that we then called WEDs but have moved to dealing with stored value in stored value cards or smart cards. We link people with those that have funds to use with those that have the products and those that have excess of one produce and may need another product that may be in the possession of others who may need to procure a product through barter. The diagram to the right shows the operational mechanism behind the WillPower market linkage model. The products traded in are either the outputs of the VACID initiative or unprocessed fresh produce from the farm.


Last Updated on Monday, 13 July 2009 06:33  

Newsflash

Why an Incubatee Needs WillPower
The incubation period for an individual business is normally one to three years. Our management, and board of directors, invests time and money in a feasibility studies to lay the groundwork for a successful incubation programme.

Africa needs many business incubators, we need others to come on board and support this focus of business development. For you to set up an incubator, you will need to conduct an effective feasibility study, which will help determine whether the proposed project has all the factors crucial to an incubator’s success which include:
• A solid market
• A sound financial base
• Strong community support and
• A policy support perspective to attract government linkage.